Operation “Over-the-top” | Rounding up American citizens

By Philip…..

I just read the report about the success of “Operation Frostbite” recently carried out in West Virginia. I was one of the 369 registered citizens that were checked on, and I have a few thoughts on the subject.

“Operation Frostbite”: Why do they need a name if not to pander to and sensationalize for the press? This was a compliance check, so why not just call it that? Is it because the headline “State Police, U.S. Marshal conduct sex offender compliance check” just doesn’t sell like “State Police, U.S. Marshal round up sex offenders in ‘Operation Frostbite’ effort“?

U.S Marshal John Foster stressed to reporters at State Police Headquarters in South Charleston that the round up was not “a witch hunt.” Why then is it referred to as a “round up,” as though they were going after cattle? If an explanation is offered without prompting, like happened here – it is not a witch hunt — then it probably actually is, or why else say that it isn’t?

Foster said, “In no way, shape or form are we out trying to catch somebody to make it hard on them. However, the law does require that the West Virginia State Police go out and look for sex offenders and make sure that they stay in compliance.” This is correct; the law requires compliance checks be conducted, so again I ask: why are you referring to it as a “round up” or “Operation Frost-bite” instead of an annual compliance check? And why use the terminology “go out and look for sex offenders”? They weren’t lost. There is nothing to indicate that every one was not where he or she was supposed to be.

20% of the registered citizens checked had minor violations. Staying in compliance involves a great deal of detail and can be complicated. If I were running a business order process, for example, and my customers had a +20% failure rate in filling out the details needed to order, then I wouldn’t be in business for very long. I wonder if it is time to look at the process instead of the people?

2% of the registered citizens checked had serious violations: 4 had CP, 1 had a firearm in the house, and 1 had a warrant for a sexual offense, which is most likely a re-offense. The CP possessions will also be considered re-offenses of a sexual nature. This is slightly less than 2% re-offense, which is in the range of what most follow-up studies find and is very, very low.

State Police Lt. Michael Baylous said that because someone is not on the registry doesn’t mean he is not a sex offender and that “One reason could be that they simply haven’t been caught yet.” This was a compliance check of registered citizens. What significance does addressing those who have never been charged or convicted have in analyzing the results of the compliance check?

“ ‘Operation Frostbite’ is an annual roundup conducted by State Police and the U.S. Marshal Service to help keep children safe in West Virginia,” Baylous said. The implication in this language is that all registered citizens have convictions that involve minors.  Baylous continues, “We are very fortunate to have them and that they’re helping ensure the safety of our children.” This appeal to the public is nothing more than a variation of the “If it saves one child” mantra. Using the resources of the U.S. Marshal Service to verify the compliance of individuals who are, apparently, 100% compliant in living where they should be living and 98% compliant with their compliance conditions seems to at least call into question whether this is the best use of those resources.

 

 

19 comments for “Operation “Over-the-top” | Rounding up American citizens

  1. NH Registrant
    February 19, 2017 at 6:19 pm

    The Registry has destroyed my entire life. If I dare get in a relationship with someone ever again, I have to make sure they know I am on the registry. Then, their entire family needs to know. The registry destroys people and that is one of the major reasons it exists. The main one is the steady source of state revenue because we all have to PAY for the privilege of being publicly shamed. The other reason is plain and basic revenge. It’s a revenge that makes people feel good because it gives them some sort of satisfaction that they put all of us evil “deviants” on a public list where we can be watched and they can keep their kids well away from our grasping claws. The average person doesn’t really check the registry to see if there are any registrants in their area. But, those who do wear it like a badge of honor. They are working to “protect the children”, of course! I have to laugh at Law Enforcement proclaiming this while they allow cops to commit far worse crimes than most of the people on the registry and let them get away with a slap on the wrist and no registration requirement. So, now they want to come terrorize people in their own homes on suspicion, do they? Great. I thought we were supposed to be better than the actual “terrorists” they talk about on TV all day? What happened to that “American Exceptional-ism” that politicians are so happy to adorn their speeches with? Doesn’t sound very “exceptional” to terrorize your own citizens.

  2. mark
    February 18, 2017 at 11:13 pm

    The children are safer in Polk Co. Since Grady Judd allows hundreds of stolen guns. To hit Fl streets every month

  3. Nick
    February 15, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    If your not under supervision this is a “knocking and talk” investigative tactic. House visits are not codified in law, make no mistake they are investigating you!!! If you cooperate you make their job easier and cheaper to conduct, which encourages these investigations. I NEVER answer the door and have my attorney follow up with whatever contact information is left behind. Once your attorney gets involved they cannot contact you directly. My lawyer don’t charge for this kind of follow up, but some may.

  4. February 15, 2017 at 12:59 am

    Charleston, WV that brings back memories to me. I guess its still the corrupt and dirty town it use to be. The chemical factory of the world. Yes those in that area look for drama anywhere they can get it. I don’t know about that city today but that whole town use to be full of thugs and now with the sex offender ordeal its trying to thrive again. Ok they have to raise revenue some way even if they have to bait and switch in the name of protecting someone.
    Setting up people, doing these spot checks, coming into your home uninvited. All of this is ridiculous.
    Most of those people over in Charleston were heads to start with. Drugs were rampid to start with and sex magazines and x-rated films where all over. I lived in Charleston for a while and that was before the internet but seems these county mounties want to make a name for themselves so they will impose themselves just to make a name for themselves and to intimidate others with all this hijinks.
    Its a shame the one’s on the registry have to go thru all this.
    My advice to you all is….. People stand up… don’t be intimidated. If your weak your never gone get anywhere. A lot of all this is vain glory.

  5. Red Baron
    February 14, 2017 at 10:22 pm

    It is notable that the director of the US Marshals Service, David Harlow, was recently appointed to the board of Directors of the NCMEC, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Many may recognize this as the private organization founded by John Walsh, who penned the Adam Walsh Act. Coincidence? Maybe. But a further read of the executive list starts looking like a government phone list. Nuclear Regulatory Administration; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; Secret Service; Postal Inspection Service; Immigration and Customs Enforcement; Naval Criminal Investigative Service; Federal Bureau of Investigation; National Sheriffs Association. Coincidence or corruption?

    This looks more to me like a roll call list at an NRA convention. So the next time you read about the Marshals Service involved in one of these “Operations” that seems to be thinly veiled headlines chasing propaganda in support of the failed AWA and the sex offender registries you can give them the benefit of the doubt if you choose to.

  6. Karl
    February 14, 2017 at 7:40 pm

    How about a citizen compliance check where the cops search houses of people NOT on the registry. They would not be prosecuted, because it is an illegal search but would show a neighborhood snapshot.

  7. Fred
    February 14, 2017 at 6:38 pm

    Does a compliance check include a warrant to search houses and computers?

    When I get a compliance check I show them my ID and send them on their way. If they want to look at anything else, they better show me a warrant. If they want to interrogate me, they can talk to my lawyer.

    I have to assume those nabbed for violations were either still on probation or didn’t know when to stop talking. Not that I condone any criminal behavior, but I still expect law enforcement to go through the proper channels.

    We have similar sensational names for our annual compliance checks here. They make it sound as if the state police just decided to come together and take their community protection services an extra mile because they are just so damned nice and caring, rather than its part of their job.

    These names make compliance checks sound like carefully planned raids, executed after months of undercover investigations to bring down a crime family or a drug kingpin. They give the impression that all registrants are up to no good and should be feared.

    • David Kennerly
      February 15, 2017 at 4:53 am

      Why are you showing them your I.D.? Are you on probation or parole? If not then I would say that you have no obligation to do so.

      • Fred
        February 15, 2017 at 12:52 pm

        If you are on the registry you must have an id at all times, an outdated ID is a violation, and to prove I am who I say I am, living where I say I live, which is what all these checks are supposed to confirm.

  8. david
    February 14, 2017 at 5:36 pm

    Over the Top, indeed.

    I was arrested in a bait and switch with a top-secret sounding name. The chief of police, basking in the limelight, completely embellished the facts so as to make it as scary sounding as possible.

    What started off as me clicking on a craigslist ad posted by an adult turned into me being part of a “child sex trafficking ring”. I was one of “hundreds” who responded to the ad posted “by children”. The original ad listed their age as 18- after you responded then they said they were underage. It was the “casual encounters” section. Of course the ad got attention. Not my finest moment but, really, not the worst either. I had never done anything like that before and I really didn’t have a plan. Seems like entrapment. Also, i resent the way everyone just makes the assumption about what my intentions were. With an imaginary person!

    There were no ads posted by children. No sex trafficking ring. No children. Just cops pretending to be teenagers.

    I’m sick of lawmakers and cops using our misery to grandstand and re-enforce the illusion that we are monsters.

    • Lin
      February 18, 2017 at 11:01 pm

      Well, David, unfortunately, it’s very easy “cop” work. They don’t even have to spend time investigating a real crime that has actually occurred; just a couple of clicks and POW! You’ve got an arrest with the bonus of a news story and a possible promotion – all without even having to actually do much work – just all the exaggerated glory. Such heroes! Such bravery! Eh, yeah…..the heroism and bravery are as fictional as the crime.

      Just curious, what was actually said as far as it being entrapment? It certainly sounds like it was.

      • david
        February 27, 2017 at 10:42 am

        Thank you Lin and Ron for your responses. I’m not sure what would qualify for a legal defense of entrapment…the way I see it is if one has not been breaking the law, and had no intention of doing so- until a cop provides an opportunity and encouragement to break the law, then I feel it’s entrapment.

        As far as stings…way i understand it, to be legal stings are only to be used to stop ongoing criminal activity. So if i HAD been operating a child sex trafficking ring, then it would have been OK to use a sting to arrest me. But if that was the case, wouldn’t I have been the one posting the ads? To advertise my teenage sex slaves or whatever?

        Thanks again for listening….

        I suppose that’s why i was labeled a child sex trafficker. To legitimize their illegal sting and to inflate the statistics of internet sex predators. This particular backwoods county has received MILLIONS in federal aid for their ICAC unit. I’ve looked it up. As far as I can tell, almost all ICAC arrests have been the result of stings.

        I was “lucky” in that i received jail instead of prison. One man in my area got 13 years (!) for the same charges. For talking to a cop!

    • Ron
      February 20, 2017 at 3:33 am

      Shouldn’t even be a “we” whipped in to effect honestly. You are representing yourself as a criminal instead of a casualty. You are a victim of the most viscous scheme under these cloaked policies. I despised the fact that relationship starved or intimately rejected men are exploited on the internet when not even remotely looking for deviant or perverse interaction. People get lured and coerced often times at their most depressed and lonely periods of their lives. I can easily be exhausted from a days work come home get
      On my computer and low and behold some slick talking undercover is trying to get me to succumb to his or her ulterior motives to affect quasi/pseudo forms of criminal entrapment. But let’s slide down this stick
      with videos and recordings from the other side and show and prove how these organizations work whether private or public. I am retired and ironically a former law enforcement officer and see how easily one can be caught and charged in this trick hat schematics. You shouldn’t let good ole blue or big brother define who you are and fight back at all cost!

  9. Rajendra
    February 14, 2017 at 11:54 am

    State Police Lt. Michael Baylous said that because someone is not on the registry doesn’t mean he is not a sex offender and that “One reason could be that they simply haven’t been caught yet.”

    – I reckon Mr. Baylous is a sex offender himself, just not caught yet.

  10. Dave
    February 14, 2017 at 11:33 am

    “State Police, U.S. Marshal round up sex offenders in ‘Operation Frostbite’ effort“? Because this make it sound like the sex offenders are offending or re-offending doing something wrong. It is to reinforce the idea that there is a continuing battle raging to keep these sex offenders in line. What needs to happen here is for one of their stupid little operations to go horribly wrong in some way to shine a spotlight on it and what it really is. I don’t think we will have to wait to long since they are now trying to kill sex offenders. They black list you so you cant get a job and now are trying to disqualify RSO’s from food stamps = death sentence for some. What do RSOL’S have to lose anymore what do they have other then a miserable existence? This is what was planned for them all along it is revenge plane and simple. What is more frighting to a man then the loss of his member. Humane people would never allow this but what about blacklisted from dating, love, and romance it accomplishes the same thing and those on probation cannot even have pornography. So in effect take away all avenues for sexual satisfaction and say its not punishment but protects children. If you want to defeat this travesty of a sham create a dating web site for sex offenders exclusively so they can truly live. Most RSO have nothing not even hope so sorry about the rant but in at the end of my tolerance with this society!

    • no
      February 15, 2017 at 9:49 am

      the problem is those on probation are also not allowed on dating websites. makes no since cant have porn but we can have sex and set there and watch sex happen live in front of you.

      also and correct me if im wrong if your on probation you dont even have to let the cops in your house unless your po is with them. i live in WV and i am on the registered hit list

      • Lovecraft
        February 15, 2017 at 11:29 am

        I believe your po or your po’s boss has to be with them in order for them to have jurisdiction to enter your residence. Many people on parole do not know that, but from what I have heard you do not have to allow them entry unless your po is with them. If someone can verify that would be great. I looked over my parole papers for nc and it states in mine that any warrantless search is to be conducted by my po.

  11. In Search of Liberty
    February 14, 2017 at 10:18 am

    Does anyone recall their history? Specifically, Nazi Germany, circa 1930 -1945? You know, I would like to hear the opinions of WWII veterans on today’s America. Hear what they think about SO laws. Why? Because these men fought against this same type of tyranny in Europe and the Pacific, against Germany and Japan. Both these Countries practiced the very same policies as America does today with RSOs. Germany against the Jewish people and Japan against the Chinese and Korean people. Oppression, denial of rights and privileges, banishment, harassment. Are these not the same things America’s RSO suffer? Most definitely, which begs the question: have we in America sunk to the same level of depravity and mean spiritedness as the Nazi and in the process forgot what our brave men and women fought for and against in WWII? So again, I would love to speak with a group of WWII veterans to get their take on today’s America.

    • Dave
      February 15, 2017 at 5:47 pm

      Good Idea I hope someone asks them before they are all gone.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *